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    • Bubble Up Curriculum with Sam Sherratt
      By handing over some time – on a regular basis – to the students, and helping them to figure out how they would like to use that time constructively, we can truly begin to allow inquiry to happen in our classrooms. By giving students the permission to bring their world into our world we start to blur the distinctions between, home, school, play, learning and work. By helping students to “see the learning” in all of the things they enjoy doing or are interested in, we can help them improve their ability to learn in different situations. By knowing our curriculum, we can teach intentionally and skillfully as the students’ work bubbles up into and through it. These sessions will focus on ways to make these things happen. Ideas like “Genius Hour”, ”Passion Projects” and “20% time” have lifted the lid on learning in schools worldwide. But how do we set it up? How do we ensure learning is going on? How do we convince colleagues, parents and school leadership that it is a valuable use of time and space? Why this matters The importance of the teacher’s personality Breaking moulds Getting started “Tagging” the learning Involving and exciting parents Tools that help Telling the stories of learning
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    • 2 years, 6 months ago

      Profile photo of samsherratt Sam

    • Cohort: English MS/HS
      Debriefing, sharing, connecting with other English teachers from all around the globe. Cool stuff.
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    • Creating Your Own Classroom Guide; RIP Textbooks with Jeff Utecht
      Recent research has revealed that Wikipedia is now more accurate, more informative, and better than your textbook. Because of this, it’s time to think about the core text we use for classes differently. It’s time to think about how we can create a core text with students using the open content and the building blocks of the Internet. It’s time to create an always updated, collaborative core text. Creating this core text with students leads to a different type of classroom conversation. Using tools like Flipboard, Twitter, Diigo, Instagram, Facebook, and a host of other tools we will explore ways in which our new up-to-date core text changes the conversation and changes learning.
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    • 2 years, 6 months ago

      Profile photo of Chelsea Woods Chelsea Woods

    • Demonstrating Learning Visually with Nicki Hambleton
      Everyday as educators we ask our students to demonstrate their understanding. How do we do this, what methods do we use and how do we integrate technology authentically into this process? In a world of information overload we are often faced with walls of text, words and imagery. How can we make sense of, communicate and show our understanding by combining images and text? How can students use these skills to demonstrate their learning? Understanding Visual Literacy and using technology to effectively communicate thoughts and ideas is key in today’s world and this is changing how we teach and learn. This session will help you to recognise the importance of visual learning, experiment with dedicated apps on the iPad and develop some strategies to help you and your students to synthesize and communicate learning more effectively. Visual note taking is one of many powerful tools in communicating more visually and we will look at a range of methods to share learning including simple animation RSA Animate style, video and screencasting and combining text, image and voice. The session will conclude with you working on a lesson idea or context to take back to your classroom incorporating visual learning.
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    • 2 years, 6 months ago

      Profile photo of rab.paterson Rab

    • Early Childhood Cohort
      Connecting all those who have a passion for Early Childhood education. Join us!
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    • Empowering Voice, Choice and Collaboration Using Mobile Devices with Sarah Fleming
      What if student agency, empowerment and collaboration were central to the learning culture for every student? Mobile learning has permeated the educational landscape, but availability of devices alone does not alter pedagogy. Their true potential is when they are used as a catalyst for collaboration, promoting choice and student ownership in order to meet the needs of all our learners. In this extended session: Participants will uncover their role as activators (not only facilitators) of learning through the lens of student voice, choice and collaboration. Participants will discover the potential benefits of merging mobile learning devices with expert pedagogy. Participants will work in breakout groups to uncover apps that are available that can empower student voice, choice and collaboration.
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    • ITGS Teachers Group
      A place to share ideas on teaching and learning the DPs Information Technology in a Global Society (ITGS). How will you apply what you learned this weekend?
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    • Making Things Better: Design Thinking in the Classroom with John Rinker
      At the Nanjing International School our ‘Design@NIS’ for the primary years is part engineering, part tinkering, and a whole lot of making. Making Things Better: Design Thinking in the Classroom explores how NIS is cultivating our ‘maker mindset’ using a design thinking process. Defining problems, prototyping solutions and iterating on these solutions can be a powerful tool for inquiry and project-based learning in the classroom. By using a design thinking process our students investigate challenges and prototype solutions that allow them to build their skills as problem finders, problem solvers, designers, builders, and tinkerers. Most importantly, design thinking provides our students opportunities to build confidence and see themselves as agents and innovators for improving their world. In this extended session, participants will explore several models of the design thinking process by engaging in real challenges facing our schools and communities. We will then investigate what design thinking looks like in a primary, inquiry-based curriculum by engaging in hands-on ‘design briefs’ typical of our program at NIS. Finally, we will look at how this primary curriculum can evolve to be more suitable for secondary students.
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    • Rethinking Schools with Tico Oms
      In 2011 inspired by Tony Wagner’s Global Achievement Gap, a Singapore American School teacher suggested the school undertake a research trip to visit the innovative US schools highlighted in the book. So successful were these visits that SAS has since embarked on ten research trips throughout the world to learn lessons from other schools rethinking education. Based on those lessons, SAS is recommending, developing, and implementing school-wide improvement. SAS has also launched research teams throughout its divisions and has newly created a school-wide Director of Innovation position. Based on SAS’ research experience, lessons from design thinking, and total quality improvement programs from the business world, we will explore how we can make schools more responsive and flexible. The purpose of this workshop is to help you drive innovation at your school. This will not be a drab theoretical tour. Nor will it have a purely technocentric view of change. It will be a holistic, hands-on, “what can we do at our school next week and the week after” kind of session.
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    • Science Cohort
      A virtual space for the science cohort to share findings, ask questions and offer resources that can help us connect and build a lasting network for professional learning, sharing and collaboration.
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    • SHIFTING YOUR SCHOOL: CREATING A COMMUNITY OF EMPOWERED TEACHERS
      All of our schools have exceptional teachers who are doing fantastic things in their classrooms! Many times only the grade level or department colleagues actually have a chance to benefit from their expertise, and those teachers may not even realize how much they have to share. For those who want to create a more collaborative learning community where teachers feel empowered to make change, share learning, and continue to grow professionally, it may be hard to know where to start. This session will focus on building an empowered learning community in your school that can elevate conversations, shift pedagogy, influence future directions for your school, and take risks in a safe environment. Based on strategies implemented at Yokohama International School, Japan and International School Bangkok, Thailand, both teachers and coaches will walk away with lots of great ideas for creating a connected community of learners that can help influence teaching and learning at your school.
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    • 2 years, 6 months ago

      Profile photo of Kim Cofino Kim Cofino

    • Social Entrepreneurship with Warren Apel
      Running a business is an excellent way for students to gain the types of “real-world skills” we’ve been talking about for years. The internet has leveled the playing field for student-run businesses, allowing anyone to compete in today’s marketplace. Businesses today don’t have to be purely about profit, either – they can exist for a variety of purposes. Your students can literally change the world. I’ll show you how.
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    • 2 years, 6 months ago

      Profile photo of warren.apel Warren

    • The Road Toward Empowerment Through Digital Citizenship with Chrissy Hellyer
      All too often, we hand students and teachers tools without providing a base knowledge of how to effectively use these tools to be active, healthy citizens within our society. Instead of teaching students to be afraid of what others can learn about them online, the goal is to teach them how digital footprints can connect them to learning communities and opportunities they care about. This session will break down the huge task of integrating digital citizenship into our curriculum through the following four themes: Learn, Balance, Protect and Respect.
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    • 2 years, 6 months ago

      Profile photo of Max Cady Max Cady

    • Understanding and Connecting to the Nontraditional Student with Michael Boll
      Take a look around the modern classroom today and you may find a batch of students all learning in a similar way and succeeding. However, look a little deeper and you will find the outliers; students who are either blazing past everyone or struggling to keep up. Today, like never before, we have a better understanding of how these students function, what drives them and how we can assist them. This workshop will focus on how to both identify your unique learners and design a program to improve their ability to succeed.
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    • 2 years, 6 months ago

      Profile photo of Caitlin Bell Caitlin Bell

    • Understanding Parenting with Adam Clark
      At this point, there isn’t much question regarding the benefits of integrating technology into our schools. While we are in an incredibly exciting time of increasing possibility, our pervasive use of technology presents a few consistent challenges to both school and home environments. As schools, we are able to implement technological advances alongside well-crafted and effective responsible use agreements. Parents, on the other hand, can find themselves without the resources or understanding to organize their homes or develop the relationships with their children to utilize technology and avoid some of the most likely pitfalls. During this session we will discuss and clarify the most common issues parents encounter as learning requires technology and what schools can do to educate and empower their parent communities.
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    • 2 years, 6 months ago

      Profile photo of clarka Adam

    • Visual Literacy: The Overlooked Skill with Heather Dowd
      Visual literacy is the “ability to interpret, negotiate, and make meaning from information presented in the form of an image.” Teaching math and reading literacy skills are embedded in our curriculum, but there is rarely an explicit mention of visual literacy. Common Core State Standards (CCSS), National Council of Teachers of English Standards (NCTE), and The Mid-Continent Research for Education and Learning Corporation (McRel) all include visual literacy standards, yet we have not changed our curriculum to explicitly address these standards. More and more we ask students to not only interpret graphics to help them learn, but also to create graphics to communicate their learning. Together we will explore why it is important to help students and ourselves develop visual literacy and design skills to be able to give meaning to the graphics we create. The purpose of these graphics ranges from communicating learning (posters, pamphlets, slideshows) to sending a persuasive message for a service organization (posters and advertising) to creating a positive digital footprint (portfolios for college admission and our own teacher portfolios). While we will focus on good graphic design, the skills we will discuss are equally applicable to other forms of media.
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    • 2 years, 6 months ago

      Profile photo of douglas_taylor Doug

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